Ken Horst

Scoop.It: The Topic-Centric Curation Tool

As an Internet marketer I am always on the hunt for new content marketing tools that can increase my efficiencies and improve engagement with my audience.  I cannot begin to express how valuable content curation can be if done right.  It will allow you tap into and respond to what people are searching for, what they like to read and share, what influences their buying decisions and so on.  In my search for a new means of marketing I came across a tool called Scoop.It.  Below I have detailed my review of this tool including some of it’s cool features.

There were a lot of interesting tools on the list but one stood out, Scoop.it so I decided to look into it further.  The first thing I noticed is that the tool is in beta and I needed to sign up for an invite to be able to use this tool.  I’m happy to say my request was granted just 48 hours after submission, so right away I started to like Scoop.it (Once you are in and hit a minimum level of use, you are awarded 9 invites).

A few of the things in the post about Scoop.it that caught my eye were the ability to use an unlimited amount of sources (websites, RSS feeds, specific social media accounts, etc.).  The ability to us RSS feeds is important because I’m a big fan of Google Reader and already have a number of feeds I could use for some of my Scoop.it topics.

The other feature that peaked my interest was the ability to feed keywords into the tool and let it find content based on those.  As an SEO consultant and practitioner, I have great confidence that by choosing the best, most relevant keywords, I can seriously influence the quality of the content I receive from the tool.  I also know that if my first round of keywords doesn’t deliver exactly what I’m looking for, I can continue to adjust and fine tune my keywords until the curation tool delivers what I want.

I’ve been using Scoop.it for 4 weeks now and I must say it’s been a lot of fun and very easy to use.  The first thing you do after signing up is add the Scoop.it button to your tool bar so you can easily add posts as you find them.  I’ve installed the button on both Firefox and Chrome.

When you find a post/article that you want to save and click on the Scoop.it button, a dashboard appears on the right side of the page presenting you with a number of cool options.  From the pop-up dashboard you can choose which topic to add it to, change the title, image and intro copy and choose which if any of your social channels you also want to share this post on.

When you share the post on Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn, another box opens so you can add a comment.  Then, when it appears on your social media profile, the tiny url that is automatically created, directs readers to the story on your Scoop.it topic page.  This is a great way to build followers and encourage sharing and, if you doing a great job of curating for a topic, you will see more followers and shares.

Overall my experience with Scoop.it has been very good. With the few issues I did have I was able to submit my question to support and receive a response in less than 24 hours.  I’ve been using the tool to curate content 3-5 hours each week and the more I use it and learn how to use it even better, the more I want to use it.

That said, there are 3 things I wish Scoop.it would add to this tool;

  • The ability to add multiple Twitter accounts
  • The ability to schedule sharing (It’s no mystery that there are better days and times for seeing re-tweets and shares )
  • A more impressive landing page for our topics (like Paper.li, etc.)
  • Ability to search on each topic page

While I  think Scoop.it is a great tool and with the addition of the items above it will be even better, I’m still on the lookout for the “perfect” content curation tool.  Let me know if you think you’ve found it!

 

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Comments

  1. Anonymous says:

    great tip here, Ken…I’m gonna follow your advice and give this tool a test….so thanks muchly!

  2. Anonymous says:

    What about noise levels?  I’m looking at other frameworks (expensive) that make their claim to fame the reduction in need for human curation (when you republish curated content.)  Where does this fall in that signal/noise ratio when you get your keywords in?

  3. Off now to have a look at it. Thanks for the advice matey!

  4. Vinay Upadhyay says:

    Hi, I appreciate
    the information that you have provided in the post. It is worth noting and I
    really liked the presentation as well. I will surely come back for more of
    intersting posts.
     

  5. Thanks much Ken for this post on Scoop.it! Glad you find it easy and useful! 🙂

    We’ll certainly take your feed back into account for further versions.

    For your information, we will complete private beta very soon; the service will open to all, freely and without invitation. We will also launch a premium version, with the mission to simplify and optimize business communication on the web. It will offer additional features such as (it seems we read each other’s mind :)) multiple account destinations for the share (for Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Tumblr and WordPress), scheduling of posts, full branding of the topics, team curation, comprehensive analytics / performance tacking, etc.

    Regarding the landing page, we tried to keep it simple but your point is taken. Please note also that you can customize it, edit, move and resize posts, etc, to make it more to your liking. Two examples below (from my personal curation):

    http://www.scoop.it/t/cleantech
    http://www.scoop.it/t/violins

    PS: I discovered your post thanks to another curator, @pinomauriello, so I’d like to share one of his topic as another example of fairly good looking landing page 🙂

    http://www.scoop.it/t/marketing-strategy-business

    Hope you find this useful; and thanks again for using Scoop.it 🙂

    Marc from the Scoop.it team

    • Anonymous says:

      Hi Marc,

      Thanks for your response. I’ve been a power user of Scoop.it ever since I discovered it and have found it to be very useful.

      Looking forward to seeing the premium version and the service being open to all.

      Ken

  6. Thank you for the tip.  We will try it out as we are always on the hunt to create and share content rich information

  7. Thanks for the tip. I’m eager to try it out!

  8. Jayna Locke says:

    Hi Ken,

    I’ve also been using Scoop.it for several weeks now (http://www.scoop.it/t/content-marketing-ideas, and I was glad to see your requests and Marc’s response. It sounds like we’ll be seeing some exciting changes soon. I love the fact that you can pull together the best articles in your topic areas and share them on your Facebook page, LinkedIn and Twitter. It’s brilliant!

    I am currently writing a book on content marketing, and content curation is one chapter topic. The other goal of content curation besides sharing great content, I have come to understand, is to bring traffic back to your site. As far as I can tell, that is not a feature of Scoop.it, at least in the beta version. So my hope is that the public launch Scoop.it will have this feature. I’ve installed a Scoop.it topic slider, but I don’t think it’s a traffic magnet.

    I’ve just begun to evaluate Curata. Ken, I would love to know if you have had experience with it.

  9. I will apply for an account and hopefully will be able to test it.. one quastion..are the links follow or no follow. Thanks for sharing

  10. Anonymous says:

    GREAT TIPS

  11. Ken,
    Enjoyed the article. Got a scoop.it account weeks ago but have yet to really dive in so your article was nice by way of describing some of scoop.it’s cool features.

    I also write becuase I have just gone live with a new curation tool over at http://handrollit.com 

    Compared to others I would say it most closely behaves like Storify but with some features that you may find interesting such as:

    1) login with facebook/twitter
    2) use multiple twitter/fb accounts within editor
    3) multiple selecting of tweets/photos for easy group dragging
    4) snippets, for embedding just your curated content, no headers/borders/buttons
    5) sweet real-time search for all content within handrollit.com
    6) every roll (I call them rolls instead of stories) gets comments

    … to name a few. Anyhow, check it out when you have a chance. Working on more native providers within editor; Instagram & Picplz should be done in days. 

    Hope all is well.
    Joe Szynal

  12. Anonymous says:

    Great Article, thanks!

    I’m having a problem curating: I get around to approving items ever 3 or 5 days and usually have 100 to 150 items to work with. Scoop.it is currently ordered with the newest item on the top of the stack, I’d rather work from the bottom up so my posts would be chronologically logical in order. Any suggestions? 

    Note: as an example, Flickr allows you to order a set of images from the oldest to the newest or the reverse. I prefer to have the latest photographs pop up first for viewers.

    Thank you for your advice and time.

  13. Anonymous says:

    Nice article.

    I’m using scoop.it as a beta user and since then scoop.it features evolve – many new features being added. I think scoop.it not just a content curation tools but more than that you can curate your own topics and be the master of that topic.

     I love the way it work and how easy you can post something new and share it with your friend.

  14. brianmcfarlane says:

    If you want to know how to take scoop.it to the next level check outt this great content curation course I came across last week. http://bit.ly/IePahc